Piera McArthur is one of New Zealand’s foremost contemporary artists.
Her work is known for its ‘joie-de-vivre’ and for its optimistic energy.

Piera lived and worked for many years in Paris and later while painting in Moscow became the first New Zealander to have a one man show at the New Tretiakov Gallery eliciting a glowing review in Pravda.
“In Russia, I came of age as a painter.”
Fellow painter Douglas MacDiarmid described his delight at “your mastery of your style, which is unique.” Her work mirrors a lifetime of sophisticated living in various capitals of the world, with a gently satirical eye observing the parade of humanity in a context of incisive line and vigorous brushstrokes.
“My job as a painter is to use paint.”
Novelist and critic, Keith Ovenden, wrote, “We feel an almost absurd sense of happiness, so that we want to laugh without really knowing why. It isn’t because Piera is a satirist—as some want to label her—and it isn’t solely because she is such a marvellous colourist or because of the relationships she develops between the subjects that appear in her paintings [though these are of great interest in themselves, and certainly one key to the intellectual meanings of her work] but rather, I think, because of the way the paint is applied...the glue that binds her work into the force for happiness.